Writing Power Paragraphs

Writing Power Paragraphs


 

Power paragraphs are an organizational writing model that promotes analytical thinking instead of regurgitation of facts only; this model takes writers from topic sentence, to supporting details, analysis, and conclusion sentence.
 
Sentence 1, Topic Sentence: A topic sentence introduces the subject of the paragraph. It tells the basic/controlling idea the writer plans to discuss. If there is a prompt, the topic sentence is the answer to the prompt. It powerparagraph.PNGshould include key words from the paragraph. (Pull words from the prompt.)
 
Sentence 2, Support/Concrete Details: These sentences should include facts, quotations, and descriptions, but not the writer's opinion. No one should be able to argue whether these things are true or not. These facts must prove the writer’s position in the topic sentence.
  
If using a quotation, a set-up or introduction should be included with these sentences. Without the set-up, the quotation would be marked as “floating,” a developing, but not proficient method.
 
 * First, introduce the quotation.
 * Then, use the quotation.

 

 * Make sure you don't create a run-on sentence.
 
Sentence 3 and 4, Commentary/Analysis: This is where the writer shares his or her opinions/interpretation/inference in at least two sentences. The writer explains/explores his or her thoughts/interpretations of what he or she thinks the quotations/facts mean or how the facts support the writer’s answer to the prompt or what the author/fact might be saying about the world in which we live.
 
Sentence 5, Support/Concrete Details: These sentences should include facts, quotations, and descriptions, but not the writer's opinion. No one should be able to argue whether these things are true or not. These facts must prove the writer’s position in the topic sentence.
 
If using a quotation, a set-up or introduction should be included with these sentences. Without the set-up, the quotation would be marked as “floating,” a developing, but not proficient method.
 
 * First, introduce the quotation.
 * Then, use the quotation.
 * Make sure you don't create a run-on sentence.
 
Sentence 7 and 8, Commentary/Analysis: This is where the writer shares his or her opinions/interpretation/inference in at least two sentences. The writer explains/explores his or her thoughts/interpretations of what he or she thinks the quotations/facts mean or how the facts support the writer’s answer to the prompt or what the author/fact might be saying about the world in which we live.
 
Sentence 8: Conclusion: This sentence wraps everything up. It is not a repetition of the Topic Sentence! It should reveal a new or deeper understanding of the topic, taking into account the six sentences that the writer used to prove and explain the Topic Sentence. It should include key words from the paragraph.